Student Links and Information

 

College/Careers

College Options

Eastern Promise Website

Ione offers the following Eastern Promise courses:

  • Spanish
  • Chemistry (every other year)
  • Health 250
  • Math 111
  • Math 112
  • Comm 111
  • Success 101

Dual Credit information

Ione Community School offers the following Dual Credit courses:

  • Ag Business
  • Animal Science
  • Writing 121
  • Writing 122
  • Critical Thinking

Ione Community School also accesses iTunes University and other platforms to provide independent study classes as needed for individual students.

 

 

Scholarships and Financial Aid

Bank of Eastern Oregon - Due: May 1, 2014

Applications can be downloaded on the Bank of Eastern Oregon's website. Go to www.beobank.com, Community Commitment Link.

Blue Mountain Community College Scholarship Opportunities

The BMCC Foundation and Financial Aid offices attempt to post all internal and external scholarship opportunities. Every effort is made to keep this list up to date. However, specific details and deadlines should be verified when application forms are picked up at the Foundation Office or at the listed Web site. Applications can be downloaded at: https://www.bluecc.edu/apps/scholarships/scholarships

Burger King Scholars

The BURGER KING McLAMORE℠ Foundation, which was established in October 2005, is the charitable arm of the BURGER KING® system and is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) charitable organization. The Foundation, together with Burger King Corporation employees, franchisees, suppliers and guests, has been able to make a positive impact in the communities in which we work and live. Today the Foundation administers the BURGER KING℠ Scholars program and the BK℠ Family Fund. Applications can be downloaded at: https://www.scholarshipamerica.org/burgerkingscholars/

Cardinal Booster Club Scholarship - Due: April 1, 2014

To apply, please submit an application. Click here to download application.

Carl W. Troedson Scholarship - Due: April 24, 2014

To apply, please submit an application.

Click here to download application instructions.

Click here to download application.

Click here to download financial statement.

Click here to download rating form.

The Donald (Deacon) Hawkins Scholarship Fund/Pendleton Round-Up Foundation - Due: March 31, 2014

The Donald Hawkins Education Fund in collaboration with the Pendleton Round-Up Foundation is offering scholarships to individuals planning to attend Oregon State University. Two scholarships of $2,000.00 each will be made available to students. All fields of study will be considered as well as financial need, extra-curricular activities and service to others. Please see the scholarship board for an application.

Free Application for Federal Student Aid - FAFSA

The office of Federal Student Aid provides grants, loans, and work-study funds for college or career school. The FAFSA Website can be found at: https://fafsa.ed.gov/

Happy Canyon Foundation Scholarship - Due: March 31, 2014

The criteria used to be used to select recipients for the Happy Canyon Foundation Scholarship includes Happy Canyon involvement and participation, scholastic achievement, financial need, educational goals, service to community, and participation in extra-curricular activities. Please see the scholarship board for an application.

Heppner Elks Buchanan Memorial Scholarship - Due: March 31, 2014

This schoalrship is only for the High School Seniors planning on attending a trade school or Jr./Senior college next year. Please remember that in order to qualify for this scholarship you must have a parent, grandparent, step-parent, or step-grandparent that is a Paid-In-Full Member of the Heppner Lodge #358. Click here to download application.

Holly Rebekah Lodge Lexington, Oregon Scholarship: Due: April 15, 2014

Applicant must be a graduating senior from the Heppner and Ione areas. Applicant needs to intend to be enrolled in a recognized, established and appropriate Trade or Voacational school (for example: Beauty College, Mechanic, Lineman, Business, Barber). Click here to download application.

The Ione American Legion and Auxiliary Scholarship - Due: May 15, 2014

Please see the scholarship board for an application.

Ione Volunteer Fireman's Scholarship - Due May 14, 2014

The Ione Volunteer Fire Department Scholarship Program is open to any Ione High School Senior praparing to enter a Community College or a Four Year College or University. The scholarship is $200 a year for two years. Click here to download application.

Jason Halvorsen Memorial Scholarship - Due: April 1, 2014

To apply, please submit an application. Click here to download application.

Mid Columbia Bus Company Scholarship - Due: May 15, 2014

Click here to download application.

Mid Columbia Producers -  Due: April 1, 2014

Each year, Mid Columbia Producers, Inc. (MCP) awards multiple scholarships of $1500.00 to qualified applicants in memory of former MCP General Manager, Raleigh T. Curtis. In keeping with the attributes that Raleigh exhibited, special consideration is given to the community service, generosity and work ethic of the applicants. The awards have no financial qualifications. To qualify for these cash awards, applicants must be a high school senior or undergraduate at an accredited university or trade school. The applicant must be an American citizen, and must be a child or grandchild of a current MCP member or full time MCP employee with a minimum of of one (1) year of full time service. The applicant must submit two (2) letters of recommendation from educators, employers, community members or clergy. Applicants must reapply annually. Click here to download application.

Oregon Community Quarterback Scholarship - Due: April 14, 2014

The Oregon Community Quarterback Scholarship is a renewable four-year collegiate scholarship program for Oregon high school seniors who are emerging leaders who plan to attend an Oregon University or trade school. Click here to download application.

Oregon Sports Hall of Fame Scholarship - Due: May 5, 2014

Applications can be downloaded at: Oregon Sports Hall of Fame Scholarship

Oregon Student Access Commission

The Oregon Student Access Commission (OSAC) is a state agency dedicated to creating a college-going culture for all Oregonians by providing access through information, mentoring, and financial support. The OSAC website can be found at: http://www.oregonstudentaid.gov/

The Pendleton Round-Up Foundation Scholarship - Due: March 31, 2014

The Pendleton Round-Up Association is offering scholarships to graduating seniors planning to attend college this fall, or students already attending college. The scholarships will be available to those students who have been involved in the Pendleton Round-Up, or whose families have been significantly involved with the Pendleton Round-Up. In addition, other considerations are financial need and scholastic achievement. Please see the scholarship board for an application.

Red and Gena Leonard Scholarship - Due: March 15, 2014

Applications can be dowloaded at: http://www.leonardfoundation.org/scholarships.htm

South Morrow County Trust Scholarship - Due: April 4, 2014.

Click here to download application.

Swede and Frances Carlson Memorial Scholarship - Due: May 1, 2014

Click here to download application.

Syngenta Agricultural Scholarship- Due: April 15, 2014

Applications can be downloaded at: http://www.syngenta-us.com/scholarships

Tillamook County Creamery Association - Due: April 1, 2014

To apply, please submit an application. Click here to download application.

Umatilla-Morrow County Farm Bureau - Due: April 15, 2014

Please see the scholarship board for an application.

University of Oregon Alumni Association Let 'Er Duck Chapter Scholarship - Due: May 1, 2014

A $600 Scholarship for a resident and graduate of Umatilla, Morrow, Union or Wallowa County high schools. A current student of the University of Oregon meeting these same criteria may also recieve a $600 scholarship. Click here to download application.

 

Elementary Teacher's Pages

 

Barbara Collin

School Program Tuesday December 11, at 6:30

Brandi Orem

3rd Grade Teacher

Math

Dictionary

 

Writing

Remember to do your writing journal every night.

Linda Neiffer

First Grade

Math

1. Rainforest Math Great site filled with game options at different grade levels!

2. www.eduplace.com/kids/mw/egames/ega_1.html More math games to learn and play!

3. www.cogcon.com/gamegoo/gooey.html

4. http://www.eduplace.com/kids/mhm/

Reading

1. Starfall  A site filled with reading games...Give it a try!

2. www.storylineonline.net/  Read and listen to a story online.         

3. www.storyplace.org/   

4. www.cogcon.com/gamegoo/gooey.html

5. readwritethink.org/materials/wordwizard/ 

6. http://teacher.scholastic.com/clifford1/flash/vowels/index.htm

Science

Would you like to explore our world? Learn about an animal? Try one of the following science sites:

1. http://www.globio.org/glossopedia/default.aspx

2. http://www.exploratorium.edu/poles/index.php

3.  www.kidsfarm.com/

Writing

Please remember to do your Home/School Journal this week!

1. www.meddybemps.com/letterary/index.html - A handwriting and writing web site. Try it... it's fun!

Mathieu, Lea

Visit my blog for daily assignments!

AR Bookfinder

Click here to go to the Renaissance book search to find out if your book has a quiz and what its level is.

 

 

 

Bedford Reader Exercise Central

This is the place to practice your writing and grammar skills.  From time to time I'll assign pieces of this -- it's also a fun way to spend your free time (really!).

http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/exercisecentral/Exercises

 

 

COMMON CORE STANDARDS

To save time (and typing) I will refer to the Common Core Standards by number in my weekly blogs.  For those of you who are interested, here are the descriptors of each number, divided by 9-10 standards and 11-12 standards.  You will note that many of our weekly units will cover multiple standards, as I strive to integrate reading, writing, and speech.

Please contact me if you ever have questions about the Common Core; if I don't know the answer, I'll find out.

 

AttachmentSize
COMMONCORE 910.doc96 KB
COMMONCORE 1112.doc97 KB

INTRODUCTION TO ACADEMIC WRITING Spring 2014

Introduction to Academic Writing: Spring Semester 2014                                    Ms. Mathieu

This semester we will meet the following Common Core standards in writing:

9-10.W.1        Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

  1. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  2. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.
  3. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
  4. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

9-10.W.2        Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

  1. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
  3. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.
  5. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  6. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

9-10.W.4        Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

9-10.W.5        Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

9-10.W.6        Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

We will also meet following standards in language:

9-10.L.1        Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

  1. Use parallel structure.*
  2. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

9-10.L.2        Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

  1. Use a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more closely related independent clauses.
  2. Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation.
  3. Spell correctly.

Assignments:

                    For the third quarter, we will write an informative/expository essay a week, based on a video or reading that we will first explore together.  

                    We will write arguments during the fourth quarter

                    Throughout the semester, we will have spelling tests every Monday – the list will be distributed a week earlier.

Grading:

The gradebook for writing will look a little strange for this class: Instead of assignments, grades will be given for specific skills. 

  • Developmental skills are worth 20 points;
  • Standards assessed in full essays are worth 100 points.  
  • Meeting a standard is a “C” (15 or 75);
  • Exceeding the standard is an “A” or “B” (17 or 19, 85 or 95). 
  •  If you fail to meet the standard, you will receive a 0 for the assignment.

Spelling tests will be graded on a 0-20 scale.

It is easy to make a C in this class; you will have to work hard to make an A.

Attendance:

We will work on essays developmentally, so you will probably find it much easier to succeed in class if you’re here every day.

LITERATURE OF WAR Spring 2014

Just War Theory and WWII: Assignment beginning April 14, 2014.

Students will review the six precepts of just war theory and apply them to President Roosevelt's declaration of war against Japan in 1941.  Students have been given all texts required for the project - no research is needed.

The scoring guide:

Does your introduction explain what the purpose of just war theory is?

Do you have distinct paragraphs for each requirement, and do you summarize the requirement and explain how Roosevelt met (or did not) meet it?

(The requirements: just cause, right intention, proper authority and public declaration, last resort, probability of success, and proportionality.  Note that the last is not addressed in Roosevelt's speech, but is implied by Japan's allies in WWII - indeed, Hitler declared war on the United States three days later.)

Do you have a conclusion about whether America's entry into WWII was morally justified?

If you use direct quotes, add a "Works Cited" page at the end, and include the appropriate citation for Moseley or Orend at the bottom of "The Theory of Just War" page, or this citation for Roosevelt:

Roosevelt, Franklin D.  "Transcript of Joint Address to Congress Leading to a Declaration of War Against Japan (1941)."  8 Dec. 1941.  U.S. National Archives and Records Administration.  Web.  10 April 2014.

The grade for this assignment will be based on content (75%) and method (25%).  Full drafts are due Monday, April 21.  I will edit for revision and correction.  Final papers are due April 28.

.

This assignment meets several Common Core standards, including but not limited to:

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.     

Analyze seminal U.S. documents of historical and literary significance, including how they address related themes and concepts.

Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

  • Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  • Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.
  • Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
  • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

Write using standard English grammar, capitalization, spelling, and punctuation; write using varied sentence structures. 

 

On-Line Grammar Practice

 Visit this website to practice grammar skills.  The access code is eek-1002.

On-Line Writing Lab from Purdue

Purdue OWL is a great resource for research and analytical papers, including citation details for both MLA and APA styles -- and here it is: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/

Language arts class will use MLA; my psychology class will use APA.

 

 

SAT Practice

Click here for SAT test practice: http://sat.collegeboard.org/practice/

 

WORLD LITERATURE SPRING 2014

World Literature: The Novels Project 

We will spend the rest of this year reading 20th and 21st century novels from around the world (other than the United States).  WHY?  You may ask.  As you already know from short stories and poetry, world literature gives us a window into the lives of people and cultures we may never encounter, but through reading, we come to know them.  Your responses to the books will indicate that you have read carefully enough to understand lives other than your own.  This will, I guarantee, lead to a more fulfilled life.

The third quarter (for this class, January 6-March 20) will be spent in your choices from among four offered novels.  These books often describe tough circumstances – understand that violence, oppression, and sexual and economic exploitation are part of everyday life for many people in the world.  The books are not written as escapist entertainment, but to communicate history and culture.

I offer four books to choose from: you need to read at least 600 pages by March 3.  Expect to read at least 80 pages a week. 

 Nectar in a Sieve by Kamala Markandaya (India) – 141 pages

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Aleksander Solzhenitsyn (Russia) - 98 pages

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak (Australia)550 pages

A House for Mr. Biswas by V.S. Naipaul (Trinidad) – 435 pages

Assignments and Grading:

            You will keep a reader-response journal by chapter.  On Thursdays, you will meet with others who are reading the same book, and you will share what you’re thinking.  You will hand in your journal to me when you finish the novel.  Your two or three journals are worth 25% of your grade this quarter.

            On March 3, we will begin writing papers.  You will choose ONE of the books you read to explore its sociocultural context or to analyze through a Marxist or feminist lens.  What did you learn from the book?  Do a little research to find out more.   Your final paper will be 4-5 pages long with at least three sources (one of which will be the novel itself).  Drafts are due March 13, for 5% of your grade.  The final paper is due March 20 – NO EXTENSIONS – for 50% of your grade.

            We will also have two on-demand writing assignments during the quarter.  Each will be worth 10% of your grade (a total of 20%).

The fourth quarter will be an independent project in which you create a reading list of at least 1,000 pages from a country, author, or theme (those of you who struggle with reading may have that shortened, on an individual basis).  We’ll get started on that right after spring break.

 

.

 

 

AttachmentSize
WorldLitFall13.doc28 KB

WRITING 122 Spring 2014

WRITING 122:   January 27-June 11,2014

This class is offered for dual credit through Blue Mountain Community College; all students have previously earned credit for Writing 121.  The following course description is taken from the BMCC course syllabus, which also provides learning outcomes for the class.  Since we meet for 18 weeks and the college class meets for 10, I have added a literature component.

Course Description

The second of a two-course sequence, this course focuses on the development of student skills in evaluating and composing essays of various lengths, with emphasis on style of expression, logical thought and evidence, and argumentative approaches and strategies.   The course also includes a research paper with supporting annotated bibliography and a literary analysis.

Evidence of Learning:

Students will read and respond to a variety of short texts and one novel. 

Students will write in a variety of forms:

  • Continuous on-demand pieces of 1-2 pages each
    • Reading responses, both open and guided
    • Progymnasmata exercises
    • Discussion summaries
    • Two exams (mid-term and final) that include short essays
  • Four polished pieces of 2-4 pages each with evidence of development (e.g., brainstorming, graphic organizers, drafts).
  • One persuasive advertising campaign to include print graphics and a 60-second video.
  • One researched argument of 5-6 pages, with an annotated bibliography of at least 5 sources and evidence of development (e.g., brainstorming, graphic organizers, drafts, peer feedback).
  • One literary analysis of 4-6 pages, with research optional.  Development of the paper will parallel the reading of the text.

Resources:  Purdue OWL online is our primary reference for understanding rhetoric and developing academic writing, including MLA formats.  This will be supplemented with the print text The Bedford Reader, 10th ed.  Students will work through the text Rhetorical Devices in a three-week unit highlighting that subject.  Our novel for the semester is The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Instructor: Lea Mathieu has been teaching for 14 years; she is nationally certified in adolescent and young adult language arts and holds three master’s degrees (theology, education, and English).  She is best reached at lea.mathieu@ione.k12.or.us.

 

Course Progression (subject to change as need and desire arise):

Weeks 1-2:

Weeks 3-5:

  • Rhetorical Devices, with exercises in Rhetorical Devices: A Handbook and Activities for Student Writers (print).
  • Two on-demand 2-4 page essays using devices.

Weeks 6-7:

  • Progymnasmata:  Practicing the form and development of classical rhetoric.  Primary reference: The Forest of Rhetoric on byu.edu.
  • 2-4 page essay: Comparative analysis of pro/con arguments on the same topic, emphasizing audience and appeals.  Sources:  Opposing Viewpoints in Context, ProCon, both online.

Weeks 8-9:

  • Visual rhetoric.  The appeal of advertising (pathos, logos, ethos, again). 
  • Create a persuasive advertising campaign concerning a public health issue with print materials and a 60-second video ad.
  • Mid-Term Exam

Weeks 10-13:

  • Review the research process: Purdue OWL and The Bedford Reader.
  • Analyze through small group discussion three exemplar papers.
  • Brainstorm ideas for a researched argument – what do you really care about?
  • Developing a thesis and support.
  • Conducting research: The annotated bibliography (minimum of five sources). 
  • Drafting and revising with your peers.
  • Researched argument of 5-6 pages.

Weeks 14-17:

  • Introduction to the rhetoric of fiction.
  • Read The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, discussing the text and developing an analytical paper as we read according to a schedule.  Students will choose a character to follow in depth: Hester, Dimmesdale, or Chillingworth.  How do their private and public lives differ?   How do they present themselves to the world, to their intimates, and to the reader?  Why does their identity change according to audience?  What rhetorical devices does Hawthorne use to develop the characters and their conflicting identities?
  • Literary analysis on character development of 4-6 pages; research is optional.
  • Final Exam

Week 18:

  • Students will present their best/favorite writing of the semester as a speech to the class with graphic support (e.g., Keynote, PowerPoint).  Seniors will go first.

Mrs. Holland

To see class projects click on the link below.

Mrs. Spivey

 

 

 

 

 

Book Reviews by Kids

Reading is Fun!

Just ask kids they will tell you all about the best books at the Spaghetti Book Club.

National Geographic Cool Animals

Creature Features

Find your favorite animal and:

read about them, see pictures, watch videos, and have fun!

Read Write Think!!!

  1. ABC Match     Memory matching game with pictures and letters
  2. Acrostic Poems     Create an acrostic poem
  3. Animal Inquiry     A graphic organizer for an animal study
  4. Bio-Cube    Helps you with the biography of someone
  5. Book Cover Creator     Create a new book jacket for a book (book report)
  6. Book Cover Guide     Learn how to create a book cover first
  7. Book Character Trading Cards     This is fun!  Create trading cards (book report)
  8. Circle Plot Diagram     Graphic organizer (life cycle, pumpkin, frogs)
  9. Comic Creator     Create your own comic--be sure to use the planning sheet first
  10. Compare and Contrast     Graphic organizer
  11. Compare and Contrast Guide   What does it mean to compare and contrast?
  12. Construct a Word     Make your own words by adding letters together
  13. Crossword Puzzles     Make your own or play with a premade puzzle
  14. Diamante Poems     Follow the guide to create a diamante poem
  15. Drama Mapping     Use with a book to tell us more about something
  16. Essay Mapping     Use to help you write reports
  17. Idioms     Fun tool to create your own idioms
  18. Fact Finder     Practice at finding facts in information text 
  19. Flip Book     Make your own flip book
  20. Flip a Chip     Fill-in-the-blank and requires printing???
  21. Fractured Fairy Tales     fun
  22. Hero's Journey     Advanced-use a hero figure to write an advanced story
  23. Letter Generator     Helps you write a letter
  24. Mystery Cube    Similar to biocube, but based on a mystery story
  25. Picture Match     Play a matching game to identify sounds
  26. Post Card Creator     Write your own postcard
  27. Printing Press     Student newletter book reviews  
  28. Riddle Maker     Make your own riddles
  29. Shape Poems     Write a poem and print it
  30. Stapleless Book     Create your own story
  31. Timeline 
  32. Venn Diagrams     Compare and contrast two topics
  33. What's in the Bag     Vocab practice
  34. Word Family Sort     Sort words 
  35. Word Wizard     Word game for 4 popular titles

 AD, OL, SI      AD       SI      Book      Scott Foresman

Science Stuff

Check out the PBS Zoom website for cool science experiments, games, and projects.

Teachers' Pages and Course Syllabi

 Image: Student reading a book

Bemrose, J. - Music

Coming Soon...

Burghard, Orissa.-Science and Art The Perfect Combination!

Ms. Orissa Burghard's Home Page

Ms. Burghard teaches Middle School Science, Biology, Physical Science, and Art. 

Contact Information

orissa.burghard@ione.k12.or.us

Resources, Links and Course Information

 

Ms. Burghard's Education Link

The following is a link to my

"Education Web Page". 

I have many interesting sites listed under "Education resource center" and "Fun activities".

sites.google.com/a/pacificu.edu/ms-orissa-burghard-s-education-page/

 

Click the above link to access Ms. Orissa Burghard's Education Web Page! 

Period 1- Physical Science

 

9/10/2012

Read 2.6-2.10 and answer questions 13-20 on page 32.

 

 

 

Welcome back to school!

 

Describe what you see.

What parts of your description are pure observations? What parts are inferences?

What is the difference between inference and observation?

How is inference dangerous?

How is inference useful?

Could you build a theory without using your own background knowledge? 

 

 

Period 2- Biology

Welcome back to school! 

 

Today we will look at the difference between inference and observation.

Describe what you see.

What part of your descriptions are pure observations?

What part of your descriptions are inferences?

How is inference dangerous?

How is inference useful?

Could you build a theory without using your own background knowledge?

 

 

 

 

 

Period 3- 7th Grade Earth Science

Welcome Back to School!

Today we will be discussing ovservation and inference.

Write a description of the two specimins.

What parts of your description are pure observations? What parts are inferences?

What is the difference between inference and observation?

How is inference dangerous?

How is inference useful?

Could you build a theory without using your own background knowledge?

 

Period 5- 8th Grade Earth Science

8/27/2012

Welcome Back to School!

Today we will be discussing ovservation and inference.

Write a description of the two specimins.

What parts of your description are pure observations? What parts are inferences?

What is the difference between inference and observation?

How is inference dangerous?

How is inference useful?

Could you build a theory without using your own background knowledge?

 

Period 6- Middle School ART

8/27/2012

Do you doodle?  Do you sketch?  Do you build?  Do you create? 

 Over the next 9 weeks, we will be discussing the main aspects of design.  They include:

Line

Color

Focal Point

Shape

Texture

Value

Rhythm

Balance

We will be looking at artwork and discussing these aspects of the work. 

We will be creating work with the goal of thinking these aspects of design.

Just like in science, the only way to learn is to, "Take chances, make mistakes, get messy and have some fun!" 

 

Welcom to Middle school art~

 

 

 

Period 7- Art

8/27/2012

Do you doodle? Do you sketch? Do you build? Do you create?

Over the next 9 weeks, we will be discussing the main aspects of design. They include:

Line

Color

Focal Point

Shape

Texture

Value

Rhythm

Balance

We will be looking at artwork and discussing these aspects of the work.

We will be creating work with the goal of thinking these aspects of design.

Just like in science, the only way to learn is to, "Take chances, make mistakes, get messy and have some fun!"

 

Welcom to art~

 

 

 

Science Current Events

The following are some suggested links for science current events.

Eureka Alert! Science for Kids: Fascinating updates daily

http://www.eurekalert.org/scienceforkids/stories.php
This is a great spot to look for current events as well as content specific info!
How many articles can you find relating to evolution?
Which article is most convincing to you?
What would you like to see written about on this website?
 
 

Science News for Kids: (With Fun Games)

http://www.sciencenewsforkids.org/
Another great reference for current events and research articles.
These articles delve slightly deeper and cover many topics.

Erin Heideman- High School Crop Science, Agricultural Business, HS/MS Shop

Agriculture Business

Dual-Credit Offered through BMCC

AGR 111 AGRICULTURAL COMPUTERS

____________________________________________________________________________

 

SEMESTER EXAM January 23, 2014

AttachmentSize
Ag Business Syllabus 2012-201331.5 KB
Contracts Power Point479 KB
Inventory Power Point758 KB
Assets and Depreciation Power Point274 KB
Balance Sheet. Power Point160.5 KB
Year End Reporting Power Point172 KB
Valuing and Closing Inventories Power Point274 KB

Crop Science

 

This is a dual-credit college class aligned with Blue Mountain Community College to provide the following:

3 Credits- CSS 201 Principles of Crop Science

3 Credits- CSS 100 Soils & Fertilization

Registrations Due February 14th, 2013

_____________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

AttachmentSize
Crop Science Syllabus 2012-13.doc80 KB

Course Syllabus - Biology

High School Shop

The High School shop is in need of HORSE SHOES... new or used.  No preferance!

AttachmentSize
High School Shop Syllabus 2012-2013.doc30 KB

Course Syllabus - Earth Science

Objective

To cultivate an awareness of the earth sciences around us while providing hands-on activities and cooperative classroom learning to enhance knowledge.  Below is a brief list of subjects that will be covered throughout the year.

Rocks and Minerals

  • Earth and Its Neighbors
  • Earths Changing Crust
  • Minerals of Earths Crust
  • Earths Rocks and Soil

Air, Water and Energy

  • Earths Atmosphere
  • Fresh Water and Oceans
  • Energy Resources

Weather

  • Atmosphere and Air Temperature
  • Water, Vapor and Humidity
  • Clouds and Precipitation
  • Air Pressure and Wind
  • Air Masses and Fronts
  • Weather Patterns

Grading Policy

  • A - 90%- 100%
  • B - 89%-80%
  • C - 79%-70%
  • D - 69%-60%

No Rounding of Grades!! If your name is left on a substitute report in a negative manner, your grade will automatically be lowered ½ letter grade at the end of the semester. Students caught cheating on assignments or test will be excused from the room for the remainder of the period, receive a ˜0 grade on the work and will call parents with the teacher present.  There is also the possibility of complete class failure and expulsion.

NOTEBOOKS

Each student will be required to keep a notebook for science. The dividers will be:  Labs, Worksheets, Tests/Quizzes, Daily Work, Homework. A monthly assessment of the notebook will be done for each student and entered in the grade book. Grades will be posted weekly online.

Teacher Availability

If you are missing assignments, preparing to be gone, or making up past work and would like to conference with the teacher, please do so before or after school.  I will not be available in between classes or right before the class starts. You may also email me at erin.heideman@ione.k12.or.us or call me at 541-422-7131.

Making up Work and Attendance

No work will be accepted from an unexcused absence.  Excused absences will have two days to turn in make up assignments. Two unexcused tardies will result in an unexcused absence as per the Ione Community School handbook.  No make up work will be given or accepted from an unexcused absence.

 

 

Animal Science

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Field Trip to JVB Dairy 1st and 2nd periods

Edmodo #45 Due

Thursday, February 6, 2014

Sheep Breeds Quiz

Edmodo #46 Due

Meat and Dressing Percentages of Sheep

How to Age Sheep with their Teeth

Thank you to JVB Dairy and Ed Foundation for NW Ag Show Trip

Monday, February 10, 2014

Cheese and Milk Taste Test

AttachmentSize
Sheep Production A Quick Down and Dirty Power Point861.5 KB
Sheep Breeds Power Point3.85 MB

Course Syllabus - Life Science

Objective: 

To cultivate an awareness of the life science around us while providing hands-on activities and cooperative classroom learning to enhance knowledge.  Below is a brief list of subjects that will be covered throughout the year.

Classifying Life

  • Structures of organisms
  • Classifying living things
  • Bacteria, protest and fungi

Plants

  • Monocots versus dicots
  • Reproductions
  • Ecosystems, resources and environment

Animals

  • Invertebrates and vertebrates
  • Animal behavior
  • Identifying cause of habitat destruction and creating habitat

Anatomy and Physiology

  • Cell process & reproduction
  • Heredity
  • Bones, muscles & skin
  • Nutrients & digestion
  • Body systems (circulatory, respiratory, etc.)
  • Reproduction, growth & immunity

Grading Policy

  • A - 90%- 100%
  • B - 89%-80%
  • C - 79%-70%
  • D - 69%-60%

No Rounding of Grades!! If your name is left on a substitute report in a negative manner, your grade will automatically be lowered ½ letter grade at the end of the semester. Students caught cheating on assignments or test will be excused from the room for the remainder of the period, receive a "0" grade on the work and will call parents with the teacher present.  There is also the possibility of complete class failure and expulsion.

NOTEBOOKS

Each student will be required to keep a notebook for science. The dividers will be:  Labs, Worksheets, Tests/Quizzes, Daily Work, Homework. A monthly assessment of the notebook will be done for each student and entered in the grade book. Grades will be posted weekly online.

Teacher Availability

If you are missing assignments, preparing to be gone, or making up past work and would like to conference with the teacher, please do so before or after school.  I will not be available in between classes or right before the class starts. You may also email me at erin.heideman@ione.k12.or.us or call me at 541-422-7131.

Making up Work and Attendance

No work will be accepted from an unexcused absence.  Excused absences will have two days to turn in make up assignments. Two unexcused tardies will result in an unexcused absence as per the Ione Community School handbook.  No make up work will be given or accepted from an unexcused absence.

 

 

Coursework

Middle School Shop

The middle school shop class is in need of fabric scraps for projects.  Donations can be dropped off at the school shop.  Thanks!

AttachmentSize
Middle School Shop Syllabus 2012-201329.5 KB

Course Syllabus - Physical Science

Overview

To cultivate an awareness of the physical sciences around us while providing hands-on activities and cooperative classroom learning to enhance knowledge.  Below is a brief list of subjects that will be covered throughout the year.

Matter and Properties

  • Structure of matter
  • Elements
  • Compounds & mixtures
  • Measurement
  • Physical & Chemical properties/changes

Energy

  • Temperature & thermal energy
  • Chemical Energy
  • Electricity
  • Magnetism
  • Light, Mirrors & Lenses

Motion & Forces

  • Speed, direction of travel
  • Calculating velocity
  • Simple machines
  • Newtons Laws

Chemical Interactions

  • Inside the atom
  • Periodic Table
  • Chemical bonds & reactions

Grading Policy

A - 90%- 100%

B - 89%-80%

C - 79%-70%

D - 69%-60%

No Rounding of Grades!! If your name is left on a substitute report in a negative manner, your grade will automatically be lowered ½ letter grade at the end of the semester. Students caught cheating on assignments or test will be excused from the room for the remainder of the period, receive a "0" grade on the work and will call parents with the teacher present.  There is also the possibility of complete class failure and expulsion.

NOTEBOOKS

Each student will be required to keep a notebook for science. The dividers will be:  Labs, Worksheets, Tests/Quizzes, Daily Work, Homework. A monthly assessment of the notebook will be done for each student and entered in the grade book. Grades will be posted weekly online.

Teacher Availability

If you are missing assignments, preparing to be gone, or making up past work and would like to conference with the teacher, please do so before or after school.  I will not be available in between classes or right before the class starts. You may also email me at erin.heideman@ione.k12.or.us or call me at 541-422-7131.

Making up Work and Attendance

No work will be accepted from an unexcused absence.  Excused absences will have two days to turn in make up assignments. Two unexcused tardies will result in an unexcused absence as per the Ione Community School handbook.  No make up work will be given or accepted from an unexcused absence.

Horticulture

Plants are coming this week! 

Alyssum, Bacopa, Begonia, Draceana, Geranium, Petunia, Licorice, Sweet Potato Vine, Nicotiana, Pansy, Phlox, Vinca, Zinnia

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Jan. 23:  Seeding Sugar Baby Watermelon and Muskmelon Cataloupe

Feb. 04:  Seeded Dianthus, Marigold and Strawberry Petunia

               Prepared and got the hydroponic system running with 2 variety of lettuce and tomato

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Horticulture

The greenhouse will be opened in May in time for Mother's Day!  Plants will begin to arrive in January.  Please consider the school greenhouse this year!


If you have some specific plants you would like to have grown, please contact Erin Heideman at 422-7131 or erin.heideman@ione.k12.or.us

Misc.

Holland, D. - Geometry/Algebra, Calculus, Physics, Chemistry

Mr. Holland teaches Geometry, Algebra 2, Pre-Calculus, Chemistry, Physics and Geology.

Contact Information:

Resources, Links and Course Syllabi

Course Syllabus - Calculus

Calculus (Prerequisite: Pre-calculus)

The student will begin with a review of functions and limits.  There is an extensive study on the derivative, applications of the derivative, and techniques of differentiation.  The integral will briefly be discussed.  This class is not designed to replace college calculus, but rather gives the student a solid base to enter college calculus and be successful.

Grading

  • Students must pass every test at a 90% level or higher to get an A.
  • Students can have 5 attemps to pass the test at that level.
  • If the student takes more than 5 attempts, then the grade is lowered a letter grade per attempt.

Course Syllabus - Chemistry, Physics, Advanced Biology and Geology

Chemistry (Prerequisites:  one year of Algebra and one year of Geometry, also must concurrently be taking Algebra 2 or a higher math class) 

This class is offered every other year.  Topics include scientific notation, significant digits, English and metric measurements, atomic theory, the periodic table, properties of matter, the mole, balancing chemical equations, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, ionic and covalent molecules, oxidation-reduction reactions, gas laws, solutions, organic chemistry, acids and bases, and nuclear chemistry.  At least four weeks are spent in lab.  Career oriented field trips may be taken.

Physics (Prerequisites:  one year of algebra and one year of geometry, also must concurrently be taking algebra 2 or a higher math class) 

This class is offered every other year.  Topics include scientific notation, significant digits, English and metric measurements, motion, forces, torque, energy and power, matter, heat, gas laws, electricity, magnetism, waves, sound, and light.  A high emphasis is put on problem solving.   At least four weeks are spent in lab.  Career oriented field trips may be taken.

Advanced Biology (Prerequisite: one year of high school biology)

This class is offered every other year.  It provides an ample amount of field work and hands on activities.  Students study watersheds and collect water samples and test temperature, turbidity, pH, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, hardness, nutrients, nitrates, phosphates, coliform bacteria and other biological indicators of water quality.  Fruit flies are bred and crossed to study genetics.  Chemically preserved cats are dissected and the anatomy of bones, muscles, organs, and the circulatory system is studied.  Bird identification (ornithology) is studied not only from pictures and video, but also field identification.   Two major (camp out) field trips may also be taken.  This class is limited to 11th and 12th grade students.

Geology (Prerequisite: one year of Earth Science) 

This class is offered every other year.  Topics include rocks and minerals, volcanic activity, weathering and soil, geologic time, glaciation, deserts, shorelines, crustal deformation, earthquakes, plate tectonics, and energy and mineral resources.  Stream studies will also be included.  Two major (camp out) field trips may be taken.  This class is limited to 11th and 12th grade students.

Grading Policy

  • Quizzes receive one letter grade.
  • Notebooks receive one letter grade.
  • Lab write-ups receive one letter grade.
  • Tests receive two letter grades.
  • Assignments receive 1/5 of a letter grade.
  • Final Exams are worth 20% of the second term grade.
Grading Scale
Term Grade
Semester Grade
As-------5 points
4.5-5.0
A
Average of both terms.
Bs-------4 points
3.5-4.4
B
 
Cs-------3 points
2.5-3.4
C
 
Ds-------2 points
1.5-2.4
D
 
Fs--------1 point
0.0-1.4
F
 
0s--------0 points
 
 
 

Course Syllabus - Geometry, Algebra 2, and Pre-calculus

Geometry (Prerequisite: Algebra 1)

This course focuses on the basic concepts of geometry and logic.  It also spends a reasonable amount of time reviewing algebra concepts.  The student will study  inductive and deductive reasoning, proof writing, parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles, proportions and similarities, quadrilaterals, transformations, areas of circles and polygons, surface area and volume of 3-D figures and introductory trigonometry.  Problem solving is also emphasized.

Algebra 2 (Prerequisite: Geometry)

This course compounds what is learned in algebra 1 and geometry to critically analyze mathematical problems.  Topics cover linear equations, polynomials, factoring, functions, quadratic equations, inequalities, systems of equations and matrices, rational equations, exponential equations, logarithms, and expansion of trigonometry learned in geometry.

Pre-calculus (Prerequisite: Algebra 2)  

Problem solving is used extensively in this course.  Topics include a review of linear and quadratic functions, inequalities, polynomials and their graphs and transformations, synthetic division, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, and an extensive study of trigonometry.  If time allows a more extensive look at sequences and series, matrices, and statistics is covered.

Grading Policy

  • Quizzes receive one letter grade.
  • Notebooks receive one letter grade.
  • Tests receive two letter grades.
  • Assignments receive 1/5 of a letter grade.
  • Final Exams are worth 20% of the second term grade.
Grading Scale
Term Grade
Semester Grade
A’s-------5 points
4.5-5.0
A
Average of both terms.
B’s-------4 points
3.5-4.4
B
 
C’s-------3 points
2.5-3.4
C
D’s-------2 points
1.5-2.4
D
 
F’s--------1 point
0.0-1.4
F
 
0’s--------0 points
 

Physics Extra Credit

Physics Extra Credit

Extra credit will be offered over Christmas and spring break. 

An informative report on a famous scientist can be written over Christmas break. 

  •  NO PLAGERIZING!!! 
  • Minimum length must be 1000 words. 
  • Papers less than 1000 words will receive zero extra credit.
  • Students must clear which scientist their report  will be on with Mr. Holland before Christmas break.

Jim Raible. - M.S. Language Arts, H.S. Speech/Publications, M.S./H.S. Theater

Mr. Raible teaches Middle School Language Arts, High School Speech/Publications, Middle/High School Technology classes, and Middle/High School Theater/Media classes.

Classes

7th Grade Language Arts

Overview

Assignments 

Grading

  • 90% - 100% A
  • 80% - 89% B
  • 70% - 79% C
  • 60% - 69% D
  • 0% - 59% F

Expectations

Students will be on time and prepared for class everyday.  Students are expected to participate in class everyday.  They will receive a daily participation grade.  Work missed from absences should be made up in a timely fashion. 

 

8th Grade Language Arts

Overview

 

Assignments

.

Grading

  • 90% - 100% A
  • 80% - 89% B
  • 70% - 79% C
  • 60% - 69% D
  • 0% - 59% F

Expectations

Students will be on time and prepared for class everyday.  Students are expected to participate in class everyday.  They will receive a daily participation grade.  Work missed from absences should be made up in a timely fashion. 

 

H.S. Speech/Publications

Overview

In this course, students will learn about design and production of the school yearbook, principles and practices of candid as well as portrait photography, journalism, and business applications.  This will be done through lecture, classroom discussion, written assignments, and much hands-on work with digital photography and computer-based publishing. 

Assignments

  • Design yearbook pages.
  • Shoot, crop, and enhance digital pictures.
  • Scan prints into computer.
  • Organize and manipulate large-volume files.
  • Write news articles.
  • Design advertisements for yearbook.
  • Organize and execute scheduling and payments for school sports pictures.

Grading

Grading for this class is heavily weighted on participation. See “Expectations” below.

  • 90% - 100% A
  • 80% - 89% B
  • 70% - 79% C
  • 60% - 69% D
  • 0% - 59% F

Expectations

This class is primarily a daily work session with mini lessons along the way.  As such, students must be able to work independently and in small groups without constant, direct supervision from the teacher.  Students will be responsible for the operation and maintenance of expensive photography equipment and must be responsible, mature, and trustworthy.  Students will be on time and prepared for class everyday.  Students are expected to participate in class everyday.  Students are also expected to put in at least one hour per week outside of class time.  They will receive a daily participation grade.  Work missed from absences should be made up in a timely fashion. 

 

M.S./H.S. Theater /Media

Overview

In this course, students will be exposed to many facets of live theater as well as video production.  Topics will include acting, costumes, make-up, set design and construction, script analysis, directing, management, lighting, sound, and theater history.  This will be accomplished through lecture, classroom discussion, rehearsal, performance, and production (with emphasis on rehearsal, performance, and production). 

 

Assignments

  • Monologues
  • Scenes
  • Design projects
  • Short video PSA’s and feature stories
  • Longer plays and video projects as the year progresses.

Grading

  • 90% - 100% A
  • 80% - 89% B
  • 70% - 79% C
  • 60% - 69% D
  • 0% - 59% F

Expectations

Students will be on time and prepared for class everyday.  Students are expected to participate in class everyday.  They will receive a daily participation grade.  Work missed from absences should be made up in a timely fashion. 

 

Rudolf, R. - Middle and High School Social Studies

Mr. Rudolf teaches 6-12th Grade History, Social Studies and Career Development.

Contact Information

Links, Resources, and Course Syllabi

Course Syllabus - 6th Grade Ancient History

Area of Study

The study of Ancient History, including Early Humans and the civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, The Indus Valley, China, Ancient Greece and Rome, and The Americas. Focus will be on the historical, cultural, geographic, and political aspects of these ancient civilizations.

TEXTBOOK

Horizons: World History, Volume 1, Harcourt Publishers.

DAILY WORK

The first 5-10 minutes of every class

  • Monday-Where in the World? (Students are given clues about a place in the world)
  • Tuesday-Who am I? (Students are given clues about a famous person in history)
  • Wednesday-Quote of the Day (Students write their thoughts on a given quote)
  • Thursday-History/Geography Trivia Worksheet

Each assignment is worth up to 5 points each. These assignments cannot be made up if absent, nor will any late assignments from the daily work be accepted.

HOMEWORK

Typically, homework assignments come from questions from the textbook, worksheets, map assignments, questions from the Junior Scholastic Magazine (every two weeks), and questions from Time Readers (one every week). A research paper will be assigned during the 2nd Quarter.

TESTS

There is a test/quiz after each chapter or unit. Tests are usually matching and multiple choice questions, with some short answer. Students are informed of test dates at least one week in advance and a study guide may be provided. There are in-class review activities, both as a class and individually. There will be a semester test.

LATEWORK

Unless specified on the assignment, all late work will receive a deduction of one letter grade for each day past the original due date. After four school days, a maximum of ½ credit can be earned. For excused absences, for everyday absent, the student has that many days past the original due date to turn in the assignment for full credit. Special circumstances will be handled on an individual basis.

Grading

  • 90-100 A
  • 80-89 B
  • 70-79 C
  • 60-69 D
  • 0-59 F

EXPECTATIONS

Students should bring to class everyday their textbook, assignments, notebook/folder with paper, pen or pencil, and be on-time. Remember, no gum, candy, or any other food or drink is allowed in class. Minor rule infractions will be handled in-class. Major infractions will be referred to the office and follow the student handbook guidelines.

Course Syllabus - 9th Grade American History, 1st Semester

Area of Study

Students will focus on the study of American History from The Civil War to World War I. In addition to the historical study of the United States, students will examine the political, social, and cultural aspects of America during this period of history.

TEXTBOOK

The Americans: Reconstruction to the 21st Century. McDougal Little Publishers.

DAILY WORK

The first 5-10 minutes of every class will include the following:

  • Monday-Where in the World? (Students are given clues about a place in the world)
  • Tuesday-Who am I? (Students are given clues about a famous person in history)
  • Wednesday-Quote of the Day (Students write their thoughts on a given quote)
  • Thursday-History/Geography Trivia Worksheet

Each assignment is worth up to five points each. These assignments cannot be made up if the student is absent, nor will any late assignments from the daily work will be accepted.

HOMEWORK

Typically, homework assignments come from questions out of the textbook, worksheets, and map assignments. An analysis paper will be assigned during the 2nd Quarter.

LATEWORK

Unless specified on the assignment, all late work will receive a deduction of one letter grade for each day past the due date. After four school days, a maximum of ½ credit can be earned. For excused absences, everyday the student is absent, he/she has that many days past the original due date to turn in the assignment for full credit. Special circumstances will be handled on an individual basis.

TESTS

There is a test/quiz after each chapter or unit. Tests are usually matching and multiple choice questions, with some short answer and/or essay questions. Students are informed of test dates at least one week in advance and a study guide may be provided. There are in-class review activities, both as a class and individually. There will be a semester final.

Grading

  • 90-100 A
  • 80-89 B
  • 70-79 C
  • 60-69 D
  • 0-59 F

EXPECTATIONS

Students should bring to class everyday their textbook, assignments, notebook/folder with paper, pen or pencil, and be on-time. Remember, no gum, candy, or any other food or drink is allowed in class. Minor rule infractions will be handled in-class. Major infractions will be referred to the office and follow the student handbook guidelines.

Course Syllabus - 10th Grade 20th Century World History

Area of Study

Students will focus on the study of 20th Century World History from the French Revolution to the end of the 20th Century. In addition to the historical study of World History during this time period, students will examine the political, geographical, economical, and social interaction between peoples from around the world.

TEXTBOOK

Modern World History: Patterns of Interaction. McDougal Littell, Publishers.

DAILY WORK

The first 5-10 minutes of every class will include the following:

  • Monday-Where in the World? (Student are given clues about a place in the world)
  • Tuesday-Who am I? (Students are given clues about a famous person in history)
  • Wednesday-Quote of the Day (Students write their thoughts on a given quote)
  • Thursday-History/Geography Trivia Worksheet

Each assignment is worth up to five points each. These assignments cannot be made up if the student is absent, nor will any late assignments from the daily work be accepted.

HOMEWORK

Typically, homework assignments come from questions out of the textbook, worksheets, and map assignments. An analysis paper will be assigned during the 2nd quarter.

LATEWORK

Unless specified on the assignment, all late work will receive a deduction of one letter grade for each day past the due date. After four school days, a maximum of ½ credit can be earned. For excused absences, everyday the student is absent, he/she has that many days past the original due date to turn in the assignment for full credit. Special circumstances will be handled on an individual basis.

TESTS

There is a test/quiz after each chapter or unit. Tests are usually matching and multiple choice questions, with some short answer and/or essay questions. Students are informed of test dates at least one week in advance and a study guide may be provided. There are in-class review activities, both as a class and individually. There will be a semester final.

Grading

  • 90-100 A
  • 80-89 B
  • 70-79 C
  • 60-69 D
  • 0-59 F

EXPECTATIONS

Students are expected to be on time to class and bring all necessary items each day (textbook, homework, paper, pen/pencil, folder/notebook, etc.). Remember, no gum, candy, or any other food or drink is allowed in class. Minor rule infractions will be handled in-class. All other infractions will be referred to the office and follow the student handbook guidelines.

Course Syllabus - 11th Grade Government

Area of Study

Students will focus on the study of the governmental system in the U.S. Topics include the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, the Electoral College, Political Parties, Voting in America, specific Supreme Court cases, Federal, State and Local governments, Laws and the Legal System, and other types of political systems around the World.

TEXTBOOK

Civics: Government and Economics in Action. Prentice Hall Publishers

DAILY WORK

The first 5-10 minutes of every class

  • Monday-Where in the World? (Students are given clues about a place in the world)
  • Tuesday-Who am I? (Students are given clues about a famous person in history)
  • Wednesday-Quote of the Day (Students write their thoughts on a given quote)
  • Thursday-History/Geography Trivia Worksheet

Each assignment is worth up to 5 points each. These assignments cannot be made up if the student is absent, nor will any late assignments from the daily work be accepted.

HOMEWORK

Typically, homework assignments come from questions out of the textbook, worksheets, current events, and map assignments. An analysis paper will be assigned during the 2nd Quarter.

TESTS

There is a test/quiz after each chapter or unit. Tests are usually matching and multiple choice questions, with some short answer and/or essay. Students are informed of test dates at least one week in advance and a study guide may be provided. There are in-class review activities, both as a class and individually. There will be a semester test.

LATEWORK

Unless specified on the assignment, all late work will receive a deduction of one letter grade for each day past the original due date. After four school days, a maximum of ½ credit can be earned. For excused absences, for everyday absent, the student has that many days past the original due date to turn in the assignment for full credit. Special circumstances will be handled on an individual basis.

Grading

  • 90-100 A
  • 80-89 B
  • 70-79 C
  • 60-69 D
  • 0-59 F

EXPECTATIONS

Students should bring to class everyday their textbook, assignments, notebook/folder with paper, pen or pencil, and be on-time. Remember, no gum, candy, or any other food or drink is allowed in class. Minor rule infractions will be handled in-class. Major infractions will be referred to the office and follow the student handbook guidelines.

Schaber, S. - Math, Physical Education and Health

Mr. Schaber teaches Middle and High School Math and Physical Education.

Contact Information

Resources, Links and Course Syllabi

Course Syllabus - 6th Grade Math

Course Description

This course is designed to introduce and build on basic math facts and concepts.

Grading policy and grading scale:

  • 100% to 90% -A
  • 89% to 80% - B
  • 79% to 70% - C
  • 69% to 60% - D
  • 59% to 0 % - F

Daily assignments:

  • A = 10 points
  • B = 8 points
  • C= 7 points
  • D - There is no grade lower than a C on daily work unless it is incomplete which results in a Zero grade.

I expect all daily work to be completed fully and on time. If daily work is not, it is counted as an incomplete, resulting in a zero grade. All chapter tests are worth 200 points. Notebook quizzes and chapter quizzes are worth 50 points each.

Brief outline of expectations:

  • Projects: The students are to keep a notebook containing notes and assignments for the class.
  • Units to cover: The units covered in the course will be 1-8 if time permits. The units are: numbers, Intro to Algebra, decimals, fractions, collection of data, plane geometry, ratio, proportions, and percents.
  • Due dates: Daily work completed every day. No late work accepted.

Course Syllabus - 7th Grade Math

Course description

This course is designed to introduce and build on basic math facts and concepts. These concepts will be applied at a higher level of thinking, preparing the students for higher levels of math courses.

Grading policy and grading scale:

  • 100% to 90% -A
  • 89% to 80% - B
  • 79% to 70% - C
  • 69% to 60% - D
  • 59% to 0% - F

Daily assignments:

  • A = 10 points
  • B = 8 points
  • C= 7 points
  • D - There is no grade lower than a C on daily work unless it is incomplete which results in a Zero grade.

I expect all daily work to be completed fully and on time. If daily work is not, it is counted as an incomplete, resulting in a zero grade. All chapter tests are worth 200 points. Notebook quizzes and chapter quizzes are worth 50 points each.

Brief outline of expectations:

  • Projects- The students are to keep a notebook containing notes and assignments for the class.
  • Units to cover: The units covered in the course will be 1-8 if time permits. The units are: Data, algebraic reasoning, integers and rational numbers, proportional reasoning, percents, plane figures, perimeter, circumference and area.
  • Due dates: Daily work completed every day. No late work accepted.

Course Syllabus - Algebra 1

Course description

This course makes the connection between and the transition from, arithmetic to algebra.  It explains the laws that govern the other branches of mathematics.  The topics cover and everyday application: using the language of algebra, operations of real numbers, solving multiple-step equations, graphing linear equations, solving and graphing inequalities, and solving the systems of equations.

Grading policy and grading scale:

  • 100% to 90%  -A
  • 89% to 80% - B
  •  79% to 70% - C
  •  69% to 60% - D
  •  59% to )% - F

Daily assignments:

  • A = 10 points
  • B = 8 points
  • C= 7 points
  • D - There is no grade lower than a C on daily work unless it is incomplete which results in a Zero grade.

I expect all daily work to be completed fully and on time.  If daily work is not it is counted as an incomplete, resulting in a zero grade.  All chapter tests are worth 200 points.  Note book quizzes and chapter quizzes are worth 50 points each.

Brief outline of expectations:

  • Projects- The students are to keep a notebook containing notes and assignments for the class.
  • Units to cover:  The second semester will cover chapter 4- 14 if time allows.  The course will focus on completing 4- 9.
  • Due dates:  Daily work completed every day.  No late work accepted.

Course Syllabus - Entrepreneurship

Course description

This course is an introduction to basic shop and business skills with an emphasis on safety, marketing and applied carpentry.

Grading policy and grading scale:

  • 100% to 90%  -A
  • 89% to 80% - B
  • 79% to 70% - C
  • 69% to 60% - D
  • 59% to 0 % - F

Brief outline of expectations:

Students will work in a safe, productive and organized manner.  Students are expected to have regular attendance so products can be manufactured in a timely manner.  Students need to be dressed in proper clothing for daily shop work.  Proper eye and foot protection must be worn at all times in the shop. Any behavior or actions in the shop that are unsafe will be immediate removal form the shop to the office.

Shop fee

There will be a $10.00 fee for all junior high shop students.        

Course Syllabus - Health

Course Description

Ione’s health education curriculum is an organized, sequential curriculum for teaching students the information and skills they need to become health literate, maintain and improve health, prevent disease, and reduce health-related risk behaviors.

Grading policy and grading scale:

  • 100% to 90% -A
  • 89% to 80% - B
  • 79% to 70% - C
  • 69% to 60% - D
  • 59% to 0 % - F

Daily assignments:

  1. Quizzes 50 points to 100 points
  2. Test 100 points
  3. Unit test 200 point
  4. Semester test 300 points

I expect all daily work to be completed fully and on time. If daily work is not fully completed, it is counted as an incomplete, resulting in a zero grade.

Brief outline of expectations:

  • Projects- The students are to full complete all projects assigned.
  • Units to cover: The 1st semester will cover units 1-5. The second semester will cover units 5-9 with students completing a unit on CPR/First aid.
  • Due dates: Daily work completed every day. No late work accepted.